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London LASER on Biodesign, 27 June, University of Westminster

London LASER 22

Tuesday 27 June 2017

6.30 – 9.00pm (registration from 6pm)

University of Westminster,

309 Regent Street, London W1B 2UW

 

LASER: Talks on the intersection of art, science and technology

The event is free but please book at: londonlaser22.eventbrite.co.uk

 

London LASER explores the relationship between biology and design. Professor and designer Carole Collet introduces key themes and concerns within current biodesign practice, followed by presentations from students and lecturers from three London arts universities who have participated in the Biodesign Challenge, from Central Saint Martins, University of Westminster and the Royal College of Art.

 

Carole Collet is a Professor and Director of the Design & Living Systems Lab at Central Saint Martins. Her research focuses on exploring the intersection of biology and design to develop speculative and disruptive sustainable design proposals. Collet operates within a long-term framework and her research targets the year 2050 and beyond. By anticipating future key socio-economic factors and technological timelines, she aims at impacting today’s design directions so as to enable a more resilient and sustainable future. Collet’s ambition is to elevate the status of design to become a powerful tool that contributes to developing innovative paths to achieve the ‘one planet lifestyle’.

Biodesign Challenge offers art and design students the opportunity to envision future applications of biotechnology in a competition highlighting innovation and interdisciplinary exploration. 24 international colleges have worked with biologists and designers to inspire and support creative responses to pertinent themes affecting our futures. In June 2017 selected projects are invited to New York City to present their designs to members of the academic, industrial, and design communities at the Biodesign Summit. http://biodesignchallenge.org/

Teams of students from MA Material Futures and MA Art and Science at Central Saint Martins have collaborated on projects exploring Biodesign and the Anthropocene. As evidence of the impact of human activities on geological forces increases, there is now a growing argument that we need to acknowledge the beginning of a new epoch. Climate change, deep pollution, ocean acidification, the sixth mass extinction of species are all issues resulting from our activities, having a profound impact on our future lives. Students explored how the intersection of design and biology could lead to new models, services or experiences that could help reduce our impact on the planet.

University of Westminster worked with multi-disciplinary undergraduate students enrolled on a cross-university elective Art/Science Collaboration module. This year the module team was excited to join the Biodesign Challenge as it offered students an amazing opportunity to tackle new challenges. Experimental projects include the design of underwear that changes colour in response to STDs and a new 3D printing material produced from hair and vegetable waste.

The Royal College of Art took food as a central focus, engaging students from across design, fashion, information experience, architecture and visual communication to work with scientists from Imperial College. Food was selected for its blurred borders between disciplines and fields, with food supply chains combining science, technology and culture. Participants interacted with the biological, physical and computer sciences to help understand the practicalities and innovations of the food supply chain, whilst contextualising cultural and economic factors. Students were encouraged to conceive of methods of collaboration between scientific, anthropological and design disciplines to produce a sustainable food future that supports the whole ecosystem we live in.

Recent LASER talks uploaded, with Simeon Nelson and Simon Walker-Samuel, Rob la Frenais, and Alex May

To view all talks from 2016 London LASER programme, please visit Archive 2016

London LASER 18
Tuesday 15 November 2016
University of Westminster

London LASER – 15 November – hosted Simeon Nelson and Simon Walker-Samuel on their collaborative project, Anarchy in the Organism; Rob la Frenais on Space Without Rockets and Exoplanet Lot; and Alex May on digital creation and preservation.

Simeon Nelson and Simon Walker-Samuel presented Anarchy in the Organism, a Wellcome funded project with University College Hospital that explored cancer as a complex system, addressing questions relating to the impact of an art-science collaboration on participants and what type of new knowledge can be created. Simon and Simeon talked about how their research practices have been affected by the collaboration and discussed radical empiricism, William James’s method of enquiry that encompasses the arts and sciences and circumvents oppositional notions of objectivity and subjectivity. Simeon Nelson is Professor of Sculpture at University of Hertfordshire. Simon Walker-Samuel is Group Leader for The Cancer Imaging Group within the UCL Centre for Advanced Biomedical Imaging. simeon-nelson.com @uhca_research simonwalkersamuel.com  @swalkersamuel

Rob La Frenais is an independent curator and writer. As well as curating exhibitions internationally he is a regular writer for Art Monthly. Until 2014 he was curator of the Art Catalyst, the art-science organisation and has been a curator since 1987. He presented a double-headed talk, ‘Aerocene- Space Without Rockets and Exoplanet Lot’, about a project for sustainable space travel with artist Tomas Saraceno and about a site-specific event in SW France in which the Lot valley was re-imagined as a near-earth planet. These papers were first presented at the International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico this September, alongside Elon Musk’s plans for colonising Mars in 2026, but perhaps received less media attention… roblafrenais.info   @eminencegris

Alex May is a British artist using digital technology to create works that encourage embodiment, experimentation, and reflection on how this human made domain affects perceptions of ourselves, each other, society, and nature. He creates his art using video projection mapping, digital interactivity, generative algorithms, non-linear time, and life-size humanoid robots; all powered by bespoke software tools that he develops as part of his art practice. Alex presented a selection of his key artworks, an overview of the creative software he has made and released, and outlined his proactive approach towards long-term preservation of digital art. alexmayarts.co.uk  @bigfug

Booking open for LondonLASER – 17 May at Central Saint Martins

London LASER 15

Tuesday 17 May 2016

6.30 – 9.00pm (registration from 6pm)

C202, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square,
 Kings Cross, London
N1C 4AA

 

The event is free but please book to reserve a place: londonlaser15.eventbrite.co.uk

 

London LASER 15 hosts Brett Wilson on embodied realism; Meritxell Rosell and Lula Criado on art and science trends covered in CLOT Magazine; and Louise Beer and Melanie King on astronomical explorations.

Brett Wilson is a retired scientist and a founder member of the research group Project Dialogue, bringing together artists and scientists to explore commonalities across research in the arts and sciences. Until recently he was the “scientist in residence” in the faculty of art and design at the University of the West of England and is co-editor of ‘Art, Science and Cultural Understanding’. Brett will be exploring how, in a postmodern world, the original enlightenment sensibilities separating art and science have come under scrutiny with the emergence of a vigorous ArtScience movement. Lakoff and Johnson’s recent work on embodied realism, linking our powers of metaphor-infused thought and imagination to our sensorimotor faculties and experiences, effectively avoids the restrictions of a mind-body dichotomy and can be used to create a new aesthetic framework for ArtScience. www.projectdialogue.org.uk

CLOT Magazine is an online curatorial platform dedicated to art and science explorations, curated and edited by Meritxell Rosell and Lula Criado. Founded and based in London, CLOT Magazine curates intellectual content, generates debate and creates new frontiers of exploration by researching trends in areas of: bio design, bio art, human art, sound art, computing art, bio robotics, kinetics, synthetic biology, molecular gastronomy, artech and speculative design. They will talk about some current trends and compelling conversations across the Bio.Art.Tech spectrum; from artists, innovators and influencers to thinkers, writers, curators and scientists. Meritxell Rosell holds a PhD in Biomedicine and Biochemistry, BSc in Biology, MSc in Molecular Biology and Postgraduate in Philosophy. Lula Criado holds a BSc in Pharmacy, BSc in Biochemistry, MSc in Molecular Biology and Genetics and MA in Coolhunting and Trends. www.clotmag.com

@ClotMagazine      @lula_clotmag      @dancingmoog

Louise Beer and Melanie King graduated from the MA Art & Science degree at Central Saint Martins in 2013 and have since collaborated on a number of projects. They are directors of Lumen Studios which, co-founded in 2014, has produced a number of exhibitions, film screenings and light installations in London churches. These events focus on themes of astronomy and light and intend to raise dialogue about how humanity understands existence. Lumen Studios also run an annual residency in Atina, Italy and have secured a gallery and events space in the crypt of St John on Bethnal Green. They are also co-founders of Aether, a curatorial project focused on the philosophical aspects of astronomy and space exploration; recently exhibited at the Jarvis Dooney Galerie in Berlin, and at Imperial College London 29 April – 23 May 2016. Louise and Melanie will talk about their artistic practices and curatorial projects. www.lumenstudios.org   a-e-t-h-e-r.com

www.melaniek.co.uk   @MelanieKKing    www.louisebeer.com     @ SpaceWolf__

 

Programme announced for next London LASER

London LASER 14

Tuesday 15 March 2016

6.30 – 9.00pm (registration/drinks from 6pm)

University of Westminster, Fyvie Hall,

309 Regent Street, London W1B 2UW

 

London LASER presents an evening that is All About Imaging, with Lindsay MacDonald on the rainbow and the spectrum, Jeff Ferguson on human/computer interaction and Emilia Moisio on scientific imagery and perceptions of reality. Chaired by John R A Smith.

The event is free but please book: http://londonlaser14.eventbrite.co.uk

 

The rainbow is one of the most impressive of natural phenomena,
and since ancient times has been associated with supernatural
qualities. It has been adopted widely in symbolism for perfection
and completeness. Referring to God’s covenant with Noah after
the Flood, artists have included the rainbow in scenes to indicate
divine presence. But why is it so difficult to reproduce a rainbow
in paint or in print or on a display? Why can its brilliance not be
achieved in colour media? The answer lies in the physics of the
spectrum. Newton truly opened our eyes. The Rainbow and the Spectrum is presented by Dr Lindsay MacDonald, Research Fellow
with 3DIMPact Research Centre, Faculty of Engineering, UCL, and
Visiting Professor of Image Science at the University of Westminster.

 

Emilia Moisio is a freelance photographer and a photographic artist, whose research-based art practice is guided by an interest in exploring and questioning the role and functions of images in society and our lives, and consists of distinct, concept-based photographic projects strongly focused and founded on using images as a tool to examine, analyse, develop, and articulate structured frameworks of thought. Her research focuses on the conventions and public uses of utilitarian scientific imagery and their impact on our perceptions of reality. She will discuss the historical connection between photography and science, how the early assumptions of photographic mechanical fidelity impact the perceived reliability of scientific imagery, how strongly the representational conventions of scientific imaging practices impact our mental images of reality, and how this could be address both by artists and scientists.

 

Jeff Ferguson is a Lecturer in Mobile and Pervasive Computing at the Faculty of Science and Technology at the University of Westminster, Jeff has enjoyed a varied career spanning early multimedia with the Philips CD interactive group, video games animation and motion capture with Sony/Psygnosis, and public virtual and augmented reality interactive software with pioneers Inition Ltd. He recently completed a Masters in creative computing at Goldsmiths and is concentrating at Westminster on perceptual interfaces, particularly with the web as an immersive platform. He will be taking a light-hearted overview of our interactions with computers and how they are changing, with an emphasis on play. By looking at past and present work, including that with the Serious Games at Westminster research group, perceptual and physical interfaces will be explored.

Programme for London LASER 13 announced

London LASER 13

Tuesday 16 February 2016

6.30 – 9.00pm (registration from 6.00pm)

C303, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square,
 Kings Cross, London
 N1C 4AA

 

The event is free but please book: londonlaser13.eventbrite.co.uk

 

London LASER hosts Astronauts of Inner Space, bringing together four speakers interested in diverse interfaces between science and the psychic. Bronaċ Ferran, Luciana Haill, David Luke and Wai H. Tsang tackle a series of topics relating to art, neuroscience and the body including the art and science of psychedelic perception, neuromorphic computing, fractal brains, entoptic visuals and Dreamachines.

 

About the Speakers:

Bronaċ Ferran is a writer and curator specializing in the intersection between disciplines and the art of the 1960s. A former Director of Interdisciplinary Arts at Arts Council England and Senior Tutor at RCA, she is author of Neuromorphobia (hypehypehyper) an essay being published in Spring 2016 by Archives Books Berlin as part of the Psychopathologies of Cognitive Capitalism series edited by Warren Neidich.  She recently curated three exhibitions of concrete poetry from the ‘sixties and is co-editing a forthcoming issue of the Interdisciplinary Science Reviews journal, with Elizabeth Fisher, on The Experimental Generation: Interdisciplinary Trends in Post-War British Culture.

Luciana Haill is a contemporary Surrealist working with neurotechnologies; her recent practice has focused on artist Brion Gysin’s Dreamachine, Entoptic visuals and the phenomena ‘Flicker’. She has developed this into a series of performances and installations involving the real-time monitoring and sonification of the participants own brainwaves using techniques from hypnosis and meditation. She is considered a pioneering artist in her field. The ‘Phrontesterion’ (EEG & Dreamchine) referencing the notion of ‘The Visionary’ has been shown internationally including The Royal Academy, The Royal Institution, The Waag Society in Amsterdam and KIBLA in Slovenia. She is also Artist in residence in the Department of Informatics at the University of Sussex in the UK.

David Luke is Senior Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Greenwich where he teaches an undergraduate course on the Psychology of Exceptional Human Experience. He was President of the Parapsychological Association between 2009 and 2011 and as a researcher he has a special interest in transpersonal experiences, anomalous phenomena and altered states of consciousness, having published 100 academic papers in this area. Dr Luke is co-editor of Talking with the Spirits: Ethnographies from Between the Worlds (Daily Grail, 2014) and Breaking Convention: Essays in Psychedelic Consciousness (Strange Attractor, 2013), editor of Ecopsychology and the Psychedelic Experiences (2013), and is also coauthor, with Professor Chris French, of the undergraduate textbook Anomalistic Psychology (2012, Palgrave Macmillan).

Wai H. Tsang studied Computing Science and Artificial Intelligence at Imperial College London. He is best known for his application of fractal geometry as an approach to understanding the brain, mind and genome; and also as a powerful new path to AI. As well as communicating his Fractal Brain Theory he also does public talks about technology and politics, and has spoken at international conferences, including the Bitcoin conference and the Towards a Science of Consciousness Conference. He is currently in the process of launching his AI startup Fractal Brains Corp.

Corpus Grandiferum by JJ Hastings

Announcing London LASER 11 programme – 20 October

London LASER 11

Tuesday 20 October 2015

6.30 – 9.00pm (registration from 6pm)

C303, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square,
Kings Cross, London
N1C 4AA

The eleventh London LASER event hosts co-directors of Art Laboratory Berlin, Regine Rapp and Christian de Lutz on the fluid boundaries between visual arts, biology and the humanities, and artist/scientist J.J. Hastings on the complexities of our relationship with our biomaterials.

The event is free but please book: londonlaser11.eventbrite.co.uk

Regine Rapp is an art historian and curator working in the fields of image/text theory, artist books, installation and art & science collaborations. Christian de Lutz is a visual artist and curator interested in technology and science. They are the directors of Art Laboratory Berlin which, co-founded in 2006, has produced over 35 exhibitions and numerous conferences, seminars, performances and workshops. Their talk The Biological Sublime in 21st Century Art will focus on the fluid boundaries between visual arts, biology and the humanities with specific examples of art/science collaborations and new hybrid forms.

artlaboratory-berlin.org  @ArtLaboratoryB

J.J. Hastings’ work focuses upon the intersection and interplay of art and science – from philosophy to praxis – merging scientific and artistic research. She holds advanced degrees in both Biology and Bioinformatics, and an MA Art & Science from Central Saint. Recent residencies include the Khoj Workshops in Delhi, SymbioticA in Perth, the Lumen Residency in Atina, Italy, and Ausstellingsraum Klingental in Basel. J.J. is also co-founder of the bio-creative consultancy The Kitchen with fellow CSM alumna and materials designer Amy Congdon, as well as a member of both the Lumen and London Alternative Photography Collectives. JJ will talk about her work on the body as a contested space, focusing on the unique biological trace of our corporeal being through time.

jadenhastings.com @photopoiesis

Programme announced for London LASER – 17 February, University of Westminster

London LASER 07
Tuesday 17 February 2015
6.30 – 9.00pm (registration/drinks from 6pm)
University of Westminster, Fyvie Hall,
309 Regent Street, London W1B 2UW

The seventh London LASER evening of talks at the intersection of art and science hosts interdisciplinary curator and writer Bronac Ferran, scholar and artist Timothy J Senior, and kinetic light sculptor Paul Friedlander, guest chaired by Laura Plana Gracia.

The event is free but booking is required: londonlaser07.eventbrite.co.uk

Bronac Ferran is a curator, researcher and writer who works at the interfaces between arts, science, technologies and other disciplines. She set up and led the Interdisciplinary Arts Department at Arts Council England until 2007 and established numerous national and international partnerships and initiatives including the Arts Council England/AHRC Art and Science Research Fellowships Programme and the ACE/RSA Arts and Ecology initiative. She has been on juries for Transmediale (2009) and Ars Electronica Hybrid Arts (2009 & 2010) and a Senior Tutor Research at the Royal College of Art. In 2012 she curated ‘Poetry Language Code’ and in 2015 is co-curating ‘Graphic Constellations: Visual Poetry & the Properties of Space’ at the Ruskin Gallery in Cambridge. Her presentation draws on two texts, ‘Mind Over Media’ commissioned by the RCA, FACT and Liverpool University Press in 2013 and ‘Neuromorphobia’ to be published by Archive Books Berlin (ed.Warren Neidich) later this year based on her talk at the ‘Psychopathologies of Cognitive Capitalism’ conference, Goldsmiths, 2014.   boundaryobject.org   @floatingstones

Dr Timothy J. Senior is a scholar and artist, currently serving as a Knowledge Exchange Researcher for the Arts and Humanities Research Council. His work asks how contemporary forms of practice in the arts, sciences and humanities might be opened up to new collaborative influences. Following his D.Phil. in Systems Neuroscience (Oxford 2008), he has explored these issues through an artist residency at Duke University (US) and visiting lectureships at Jacobs University Bremen (Germany) spanning the arts, neuroscience, digital humanities, and the social and political sciences. In 2012 he was awarded a Junior Fellowship at the Hanse Institute for Advanced Study, concluding with an internationally-oriented conference and exhibition on performative methods in scientific practice. Tim will be taking up this theme in his talk, exploring how performance-based methods may revolutionize the study of complex systems and our understanding of disciplinary research.   art-sci.info

Paul Friedlander is an independent kinetic light sculptor and scientific artist based in London. He will give a telescopic talk on his career spanning more than 40 years from his early influence by Cybernetic art, his involvement with stage lighting for avant-garde music and subsequent development of his unique artistic media. The talk will be followed by a performance with hand held kinetic sculptures and chromastrobic light, a form of light he invented. Paul studied physics and mathematics at Sussex University and fine art at Exeter Art College. His youthful ambitions to become a cosmologist have continued to influence his art, exploring mathematical and scientific ideas in light. Some of his earliest work was based on catastrophe theory and chaos. He has a continuing interest in waves, creating many kinetic works using their mathematics in custom software he writes as part of his hybrid art.   paulfriedlander.com

Guest chaired by researcher and curator, Laura Plana Gracia.
elektronische-art-and-music.com   @elektronischeAM

London LASER 04 programme announced

London LASER 04
Tuesday 17 June 2014
6.30 – 9.00pm (registration from 6pm)
University of Westminster, Fyvie Hall, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2UW

The fourth London LASER for 2014 hosts Rob La Frenais in conversation with Los Ferronautas, Cristina Miranda de Almeida on the Internet of Things, and Chris Freemantle on art and science collaborations in medicine and ecology.

The event is free but booking is essential: londonlaser04.eventbrite.co.uk

Los Ferronautas (Ivan Puig and Andres Padilla Domene) will be in discussion with Rob La Frenais, curator, about their project SEFT-1 Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe: Modern Ruins 1:220. Between 2006 and 2011, the artists travelled across Mexico and Ecuador in the SEFT-1 (Sonda de Exploración Ferroviaria Tripulada or Manned Railway Exploration Probe) exploring Mexico’s abandoned railways: http://www.seft1.com. This iconic railway infrastructure now lies in ruins, much of it abandoned due to the privatisation of the railway system in 1995, when many passenger trains were withdrawn, lines cut off and communities isolated. They will discuss how the SEFT-1 vehicle, coming to London in June, works as a ‘transmitter of stories’ about people lives and the way the are affected by infrastructure. The Arts Catalyst and Furtherfield present the project in Finsbury Park opening June 20, more details here: http://www.artscatalyst.org/projects/detail/ferronautas/

Cristina Miranda de Almeida holds a European PhD in Art (UPV/EHU, 2005), is Lecturer at the Department of Art and Technology, University of the Basque Country and a Visiting Scholar and external researcher at the Research Programme on Medi@ctions # Digital Culture Group (IN3/UOC), Barcelona.  She is collaborating with SEAD network and Project T₂EIA – Transdisciplinary Telematic Environment for Interactive Arts, with the University Federal of Rio de Janeiro/NANO, with the International Journal of McLuhan Studies and NoemaLab Journal. Her presentation in London Laser will focus on art and the impact of Internet of Things on the production of hybrid materialities and identities.

Chris Fremantle will focus on two current collaborations between arts and sciences: Nil by Mouth is a project involving emerging artists toggling between food producing communities and the Scottish Government’s Strategic Research Programme Environmental Change, Food, Land and People (2013 ongoing).  The second is the residency programme between the MFA Art, Space and Nature at Edinburgh College of Art and the Cardiovascular Sciences Research Group at the Queen’s Medical Research Institute in Edinburgh (2009 ongoing). Chris works as a producer and researcher working with artists (and designers and architects) working in public.  In addition to the projects above, his current work is strategic: working on Scotland’s national public art development programme, and on Design in Action, an AHRC KE Hub, and on the ground: producing the Therapeutic Design and Arts Strategy for the New South Glasgow Hospitals.

LASER is a program of evening gatherings, which bring together eclectic guest speakers working at the intersections of art, science and technology. Running successfully in the US for several years, London LASER is the first of the series to take place in Europe. Free of charge and open to the public, London LASER encourages lively discussion in an informal academic setting.

London LASER is hosted by University of the Arts London (Central Saint Martins MA Art and Science and The Lens) and University of Westminster (Broad Vision art/science research and learning project and CREAM), in association with Leonardo/ISAST (the International Society for Art, Science and Technology). LASER is a project of Leonardo® /ISAST.

London LASER 02 programme announced

London LASER 02

Tuesday 18 March 2014

6.30 – 9.00pm (talks start at 6.50pm)

Room E003, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square,
Kings Cross, London N1C 4AA

The second London LASER for 2014 hosts artist and professor Rob Kesseler talking about his ‘life through a lens’, writer and curator Jasia Reichardt on the origins of the Gaberbocchus Common Room, and artist Sophia Kosmaoglou discussing the current Encyclopedia Galactica exhibition at GV art gallery.

The event is free but booking is essential: londonlaser02.eventbrite.co.uk

Prof. Rob Kesseler is a visual artist who works at the interface between art, design and science and holds the position of Chair in Arts, Design & Science at the University of the Arts London.  A former NESTA Fellow at Kew and Research Fellow at the Gulbenkian Science Institute, Portugal, he has collaborated extensively with botanical scientists and molecular biologists in an exploration of the living world at a microscopic level. Rob will be talking about his ‘life through a lens’, which for the past twelve years has involved close observation of the microscopic natural world, in an attempt to reveal its hidden forms and patterns. http://www.robkesseler.co.uk

Jasia Reichardt is a writer and curator, who has written about art and science and technology and, among many others, organised the exhibition Cybernetic Serendipity in 1968.  Jasia will talk about the Gaberbocchus Common Room, a London club for artists and scientists, and people interested in the philosophies of art and science, to meet, talk, watch films, listen to lectures, drink coffee, play chess and eat spaghetti. The Common Room was launched by Franciszka and Stefan Themerson in the basement of their publishing company, Gaberbocchus Press. It opened in the summer of 1957 and closed two years later. It was there that she attended the first lecture on Pop Art, was introduced to cybernetics, something very new at the time, and realised that mathematical models can be thought of as sculptures.

Sophia Kosmaoglou is an artist working in a broad range of media, including sculpture, painting, installation, video, performance and sound intervention. In 2012 she completed a practice-based PhD in Fine Art titled “The self-conscious artist and the politics of art: from institutional critique to underground cinema”. Sophia teaches studio practice, curating, critical theory and the history and philosophy of art. She has been a member of numerous artists’ collectives and, as a member of Exploding Cinema, she is currently planning a Festival of Independents. Sophia will talk about the current retrospective of GV Art gallery, which she co-curated, Encyclopedia Galactica (13 Feb – 17 Apr 2014). The exhibition charts the last five years of the gallery programme and initiates a research project on the Gaberbocchus Common Room. www.gvart.co.uk

London LASER is hosted by University of the Arts London (Central Saint Martins MA Art and Science and The Lens) and University of Westminster (Broad Vision art/science research and learning project and CREAM), in association with Leonardo/ISAST (the International Society for Art, Science and Technology). LASER is a project of Leonardo® /ISAST.